Letter from Mildred Bliss to Thomas Whittemore, April 17, 1941

Bliss expresses her apprehension regarding Whittemore's return to Istanbul, suggesting that he should instead travel around the United States to show "the film" since many people were interested in seeing it.

[MS.BZ.004-01-01-02-014]

April 17th, 1941
Dear T.W.:
As the days pass on I long increasingly to hear from you. It
was a real disappointment that you did not get back to Santa Bar-
bara before going East and I don't have to tell you bow truly
sorry we were that you fell by the wayside and bad such a long
siege of discomfort.
Of course now you can't be thinking of returning to Istanbul,
and as the horror comes ever nearer to Hagia Sofia on one side
and to our own country on the other, one needs whatever faith
one can foster to face not only the morrow but one's own thought
in the night.
Did you see Winnie de Polignac's brothers and what are they able
to do for her? I feel I shall not delay much longer to settle
on some definite course of action in regard to this with both
Nadia and also with Mme. Balsan. So, busy as I know you to be,
may I trouble you to throw some light on this strange, perplexing
situation.
Elsie Hooper, as you know, fell in her room and of course hurt
herself. She is far too heave to have a fall negligible, but
she is getting along admirably and has been humorous and sporting
about her misfortune.
If you don't go abroad- and really, I don't know why I should
even say "if", it should rather be "as" - wouldn't you be travelling
a bit in the United States this summer and showing the film? There
are several people here who would like to see it, and I can think
of nothing that would keep our spirits where they ought to be
as well as looking at those reverently portrayed devout faces.

Our own personal affairs lead us to bow the head to a season of
drifting. Until more benefit is reaped from the treatment there is
no thought of Robert's going East, am for him the absence from
the Overseers' Meeting at Dumbarton Oaks tomorrow is the culminating
point of misery.
When you go to Washington, don't fail to ascertain if Sir Arthur
Salter has arrived, and, if so, mind you see him. There is no
one who knows more than he.
I hope you liked Swarzinsky's Dumbarton Oaks article in the Art
Bulletin. There is one by Miss Segall which appeared in the
American Journal of Archaeology. The inaugural lectures are now in
press, so soon Dumbarton Oaks will be launched before the public
in all its aspects, - and we feel increasingly like elders who
have seen their child take flight.
With many thoughts shared with you from us both -
Yours as ever

 
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