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Announcing the 2017–2018 Fellows and Project Grants

Dumbarton Oaks is pleased to announce the 2017–2018 fellows and project grants.

Fellows

Paolo Angelini, KU Leuven (Fall)
Byzantine Studies
Introduction to the Medieval Legal History of the Southern Slavs

Gideon Avni, Israel Antiquities Authority and Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Byzantine Studies
Jerusalem and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Fourth to Eleventh Century: Archaeological Research and Urban Context

Stephanos Efthymiadis, Open University of Cyprus
Byzantine Studies
Hagia Sophia of Constantinople, 537–1204: Political, Social, and Urban History

Romy Hecht, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Garden and Landscape Studies
Botanical Practices and Urban Reform in Postcolonial Santiago, Chile

Steve Kosiba, University of Minnesota
Pre-Columbian Studies
Becoming Inca: Landscape Construction and Subject Creation in Ancient Cuzco

Michael Lee, University of Virginia (Spring)
Garden and Landscape Studies
German Landscape and the Aesthetics of Administration: Peter Joseph Lenné and His Circle, 1815–1848

Jerry Moore, California State University, Dominguez Hills (Fall)
Pre-Columbian Studies
Ancient Andean Houses: Dynamics of Domestic Space in South America

Denis Ribouillault, Université de Montréal (Fall)
Garden and Landscape Studies
Gardens of the Heavens: Astronomy and the Science of Time in the Gardens of Papal Rome

Alexis Torrance, University of Notre Dame
Byzantine Studies
The Human Ideal in Byzantine Theology

Bernd Andreas Vest
Byzantine Studies
The Urban Space of Antioch-on-the-Orontes, 638–1268

Alexandra Vukovich, University of Cambridge (Spring)
Byzantine Studies
Byzantine Imitative and Appropriative Coins, Fifth to Thirteenth Century

Alan Walmsley
Byzantine Studies
Syria-Palestine in the Seventh Century: Aspects of Byzantine Continuity

Junior Fellows

Thalia Allington-Wood, University College London (Spring)
Garden and Landscape Studies
Garden Politics: Italian Renaissance Gardens in Postwar Italy

Christopher Bonura, University of California, Berkeley
Byzantine Studies
The Apocalypse of Methodius of Patara: History and Prophecy in the Christian Encounter with Islam

Gabriela Cervantes, University of Pittsburgh
Pre-Columbian Studies
The Sican Capital: Urban Organization in Pre-Columbian Peru

Mary Kelly, Tulane University
Pre-Columbian Studies
Speech Carved in Stone: Language Variation among the Ancient Lowland Maya

Scott Kennedy, Ohio State University
Byzantine Studies
Thucydides and Herodotus in the Late Antique and Byzantine Rhetorical Tradition

Maxime Lamoureux-St-Hilaire, Tulane University
Pre-Columbian Studies
Palatial Politics: The Classic Maya Royal Court at La Corona, Guatemala

Ivan Marić, University of Edinburgh
Byzantine Studies
Imperial Ideology after Iconoclasm: Negotiating the Limits of Imperial Power in Byzantium, 843–913 

Luis Muro, Stanford University
Pre-Columbian Studies
Moche Spectacles of Death: Performance, Corporality, and Political Power in the Jequetepeque Valley, Peru

Kelly Presutti, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Garden and Landscape Studies
Terroir after the Terror: Landscape and Representation in Nineteenth-Century France

Nicholas Serrano, North Carolina State University
Garden and Landscape Studies
Ideologies of Nature in the Landscape Architecture and Urban Development of the Postwar American South, 1955–1975

Shannon Steiner, Bryn Mawr College
Byzantine Studies
Byzantine Enamel and the Aesthetics of Technological Power, Ninth to Fifteenth Century

Kaja Tally-Schumacher, Cornell University (Fall)
Garden and Landscape Studies
Cultivating Empire: Transplanting and Translating Rome

William R. Tyler Fellows

Ari Caramanica
Pre-Columbian Studies
The Forgotten Landscapes of the Peruvian North Coast: Cupisnique, Moche, and Chimu Peripheral Occupation

Philip Gant
Garden and Landscape Studies
Temple Litigation and Korea’s Long Nineteenth Century

Polina Ivanova
Byzantine Studies
From Byzantium’s East to Iran’s West: Economic Change and the Rise of Cities in Medieval Asia Minor, 1000–1400

Jake Ransohoff
Byzantine Studies
Vision and Punishment: Blinding in the Byzantine World

Abbey Stockstill
Garden and Landscape Studies
Crafting an Identity: Landscape and Urbanism in Almohad Marrakech

John Zaleski
Byzantine Studies
Asceticism in the Eastern Mediterranean, Seventh through Ninth Century

Mellon Fellows in Urban Landscape Studies

Basak Durgun, George Mason University
Cultural Politics of Urban Green Spaces: The Production and Reorganization of Istanbul’s Parks and Gardens

Jacob Boswell, The Ohio State University
Changing Climates: Social Imaginaries of Climate Modification in the United States

John King, San Francisco Chronicle
New Forms of Urban Public Space and the Publics That They Serve

Maria Taylor, University of Michigan
Between Town and Country: The Soviet City-Landscape Nexus in Global Perspective

Summer Fellows

Agnieszka Brylak, University of Warsaw
Pre-Columbian Studies
Buffoons and Sorcerers: The Merging of Witchcraft and Entertainment in Colonial Sources on Prehispanic Nahuas

Beatrice Caseau, Université Paris-Sorbonne and Labex RESMED
Byzantine Studies
Kissing in Byzantium

Jean-Claude Cheynet, Université Paris-Sorbonne
Byzantine Studies
The Byzantine Family of the Chrysobergai

Rebecca Falcasantos, Providence College
Byzantine Studies
Constantinople: Ritual, Violence, and Memory in the Making of a Christian Imperial Capital

Erlend Johnson, Tulane University
Pre-Columbian Studies
The Integrative Strategies of the Classic Maya Copan Polity on Its Southeastern Frontier

Dimitri Korobeinikov, University at Albany
Byzantine Studies
Unpublished Armenian, Syriac, and Arabic Seals from the Zacos Collection: A Case Study of the Border Zone

Maria Parani, University of Cyprus
Byzantine Studies
The Date and Context of Vat. gr. 1851: The Evidence of Its Miniatures Reconsidered

Alan Ross, University of Southampton
Byzantine Studies
In Praise of Constantius: Greek Panegyrical Literature in the Early Byzantine Empire

Claudio Schiano, Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro
Byzantine Studies
The Tritheist Controversy on Resurrection: New Evidence on John Philoponus’s Opponents

John Schwaller, University at Albany
Pre-Columbian Studies
The Rituals of the Aztec Month of Panquetzaliztli

Humanities Fellows

Andrés Álvarez Dávila, Dumbarton Oaks/Folger Shakespeare Library

Erica Eisen, Dumbarton Oaks/George Washington Museum and Textile Museum

Michael Kennedy-Yoon, Dumbarton Oaks/National Museum of Natural History

Adela Kim, Dumbarton Oaks/National Gallery of Art

Abby Westover, Dumbarton Oaks/Folger Shakespeare Library

Faye Zhang, Dumbarton Oaks/Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

Early-Career Musician

Celil Refik Kaya, Butler School of Music, University of Texas at Austin

Project Grants

Alessandra Ricci, Koç University
Byzantine Studies
Recovering Middle Byzantine Architecture in Istanbul: Excavation of the Church at Küçükyalı

Nikolaos Tsivikis, Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum, Mainz
Byzantine Studies
The Early Christian Domus Ecclesia at Messene, Peloponnese

Felix Arnold, German Archaeological Institute
Garden and Landscape Studies
A Geophysical Survey of the Islamic Gardens of Córdoba

Brian Palmer, Virginia Commonwealth University
Garden and Landscape Studies
Reclaiming an Outdoor Archive

Maureece Levin, Stanford University
Garden and Landscape Studies
An Archaeology of Plant Food Production on Pingelap Atoll

Scott Hutson, University of Kentucky
Pre-Columbian Studies
Salvaging Sources of Power at Uci, Yucatan, Mexico

Read More…


Mapping Cultural Philanthropy

Dumbarton Oaks Launches Online Resource

Posted on Apr 14, 2017 01:45 PM by Bailey Trela |
Mapping Cultural Philanthropy

Museums mark the streets. Their names are familiar; emblazoned on brick walls or carved into stone plinths, they summon up notions of extensive collections, tastefully displayed, that emanate the mute grandeur of faits accomplis. The beauty of the objects seems to seal them in the moment. But we hardly give a thought to the personal passions that chose this painting, that vase, or the quirks and whims that stocked the galleries and that, in many cases, still guide the collections.

The effort to examine the founding philosophies of some of Washington, D.C.’s renowned cultural institutions is at the heart of Dumbarton Oaks’ Mapping Cultural Philanthropy project, which launched earlier this year. The project, in development since 2016, presents an online mapping tool featuring rigorously researched entries on institutions like the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Freer and Sackler Galleries, and the Folger Shakespeare Library. The entries describe not only the institutions and collections themselves, but also the personalities—grand or self-effacing, minutely focused or broadly piqued—that brought them into existence.

“What we’re not doing, by design, is chronicling people that gave a lot of money but otherwise weren’t impassioned about their collecting,” Dumbarton Oaks Archivist James Carder, who has supervised the project since its inception, explains. “To make our list you really do have to have had a passion for the arts, theater, music—anything in the arts and humanities. And you have to have made it happen in a public way.”

Teasing out the little-known backstories of D.C.’s museums and collections reveals a web of philanthropic activity. As Carder explains, the project, initiated by Director Jan Ziolkowski, sprang from a desire to contextualize the beginnings of Dumbarton Oaks and similar institutions in the first two-thirds of the twentieth century. “We wanted to map what had happened in Washington, D.C., not only to better understand who the Blisses were and what milieu they moved in,” Carder says, “but also to show that Washington was an important nexus for, frankly, wealthy and passionate collectors who wanted to make those collections part of the public landscape.”

In many ways, the private philanthropy of the mid-twentieth century continued the thread of nineteenth-century philanthropic endeavors, though this began to change as the century waned. In charting this evolution, the project gels nicely with recent efforts by Dumbarton Oaks, including its Wintersession course for undergraduates, to examine the changing face of philanthropy in the twenty-first century. “In the last part of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, philanthropy has started to be redefined,” Carder explains. “We’ve entered into questions of effective altruism, so that private philanthropy has started to move away from the arts and humanities and into different, perfectly valid, and perfectly respectable fields, like medicine or education.”

The long-term project has seen contributions from a number of people, including a team of four interns during the summer of 2016. Recently, Humanities Fellow Priya Menon has worked to standardize some of the preexisting profiles in the catalog while also writing entries of her own. Her work has marked a shift into present-day studies, with a deeper focus on the use of primary sources. In developing an entry on the National Museum of Women in the Arts, for example, she had the opportunity to interview the collection’s founder, Wilhelmina Holladay, and has worked with other oral histories to develop profiles of more recently established cultural institutions.

“We’re really looking at private collections that eventually became public,” Menon explains, “and I’ve found that the project actually demonstrates that the public and the private can intersect in ways that are productive and even beautiful, and that care for future generations’ well-being—and that they’ve been doing this for a considerable length of time within the realm of art.”

Carder similarly pinpoints part of the project’s value in its illumination of the past and present, of the evolution of cultural philanthropy over time, and what these can tell us about the current climate of cultural institutions in D.C. The funding of a gallery or museum is typically piecemeal and complex. In addition to the legacy of the founding gift (which might include hobbling stipulations that disallow, for instance, the loaning of objects), many institutions run on a budget comprised of private donations, soft money made from museum shops, and, of course, federal money. “How all of that’s managed—and how the missions of these institutions are going to be effected—is really going to be fairly interesting in the coming years,” Carder says. “There are a number of institutions anticipating large cuts in federal funding. Right now, of course, these are just guesstimates—but who knows?”

After its launch, the project will continue to expand, adding new entries at a regular pace. Though the site’s current entries have benefitted from the use of secondary sources that lay out general histories and missions—prefaces to catalogs, for instance, or book-length studies of collectors like William Wilson Corcoran—future profiles will wade into what Carder deems “potentially problematic areas.” As the project shifts focus to more modern institutions and collectors, secondary sources will of course dry up, though all that means is a challenge, and the need to dig a little deeper. With plans to look at the founder of the Washington School of Ballet and a number of collectors who gave important instruments to the Library of Congress, future profiles will have to derive a little more from research and footwork, like the interview recently conducted with Holladay—“which is really the right way to go,” Carder says with a chuckle, “because she’s alive.”

The standardizing of the profiles—making sure one biographical section isn’t five paragraphs longer than another—has been helped along by Lain Wilson. As Digital Content Manager at Dumbarton Oaks, Wilson has helped advise the project, editing profiles and managing its design process. As Carder explains, “He’s been invaluable in terms of taking our suggestions and talking reality, and consistency, and length, and graphic style, and all the things that our pie-in-the-sky ideas hadn’t considered.” The result is a fluid interface—produced by Image Conscious Studios, an external firm—that will also double as the first phase in a broader restyling of Dumbarton Oaks’ main website.

As Wilson explains, the diversity of the project—its contributors, subjects, presentation, and approach—is built into its design. “The idea was always to have a flagship project that would run across several years and involve multiple cohorts of fellows and interns,” Wilson says. “The goal of building a project that speaks to Dumbarton Oaks’ institutional mission and history, and puts it in a broader context of cultural philanthropy in the D.C. area, is well served by many hands.”

Freer, Sackler, Folger, Corcoran—names that dot the map and bear stories of individuals with singular passions. As the Mapping Cultural Philanthropy project launches—and in the months ahead—they’ll share the digital grid with institutions like the Textile Museum, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, the Phillips Collection, and—of course—Dumbarton Oaks.

 

Explore the project

Read More…


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