Athens, Greece

 
Accession number AR.EP.TC.0299
Creator
Places
Athens (Greece)
Greece
Date
1891
Measurements
3 x 5 inches
Materials/Techniques
illustration
Work types
trade card

Description

TRANSCRIPTION

Athens, Greece

Grecian Lady / A Mountaineer / The Parthenon / The Olympium and Acropolis / View of Athens

Copyright 1891 by Arbuckle Bros. N.Y.

Anciently, there were as many as nine towns bearing this same name. The first settlement of the city of colossal fame in the world of philosophy and art, is supposed to have been on the cliff afterwards known as the Acropolis. In the earliest times there was no port, the inland site being held for safety against maritime attack. Increasing prosperity prompted the opening of a harbor at Phalerum, afterwards changed to the present port of Piraeus. A macadamized road follows the line of the long walls erected by Themistocles, portions of which are still visible from the port to the upper city. The first railroad built on Grecian soil was opened in 1869, connecting these two points. / The acropolis rises 150 feet from the top of a rocky hill, its walls forming a circuit of nearly 1,000 feet. This building had the four characters of a fortress, a shrine, a treasury, and a museum of art. The Olympium was one of the largest temples in the world. Of its 124 Corinthian columns only 15 remain. The Parthenon was built during the administration of Pericles. Its dimensions are 230 feet in length by 100 in width. The ruins give some adequate impression of its original grandeur. The walls of the principal building are surrounded with a peristyle, having 48 white marble columns of the Doric order. / The scenery around Athens is very beautiful, but the streets and houses of the modern city are poorly built and destitute of interest. The principal modern edifice is the palace of the king, its southern side, with an Ionic portico, giving its best aspect. The University is a fine structure, built in 1837 by a Danish architect. It has a large patronage of students, and its staff of Professors includes the names of some of the most learned archaeologists of Europe. The harbor is visited by ships of all nations. / Population, 107,251

Joseph P. Knapp, Lith, N. Y.

Collection

Ephemera Collection
 

Repository

Dumbarton Oaks Archives, 054.SUZ.02.PCbox.095
Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC
Accession number AR.EP.TC.0299
Creator
Places
Athens (Greece)
Greece
Date
1891
Measurements
3 x 5 inches
Materials/Techniques
illustration
Work types
trade card

Index Terms

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