Central America

 
Accession number AR.EP.TC.0374
Creator
Date
1889
Measurements
3 x 5 inches
Materials/Techniques
text
Work types
trade card

Description

TRANSCRIPTION

Central America.

Central America forms the connecting link between the two greater divisions of the continent, and comprises the Republics of Guatemala, Honduras, Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica, and the British Colony of Balize or British Honduras.  / Area, 179,742 square miles. Population, 2,417,300. / The executive government of the republics is vested in Governors, and the legislative in National Assemblies, Councils, or Congress of Deputies.

Guatemala has an exceeding fertile soil, and minerals exist, but are little worked. Sixty per cent. of population are pure Indians. Honduras has forests or mahogany and other cabinet woods, and is rich in gold, silver, copper and coal, which are, however, little wrought. Nicaragua has left her magnificent resources almost wholly undeveloped, and the chief occupation is the rearing of cattle, carried on in a rude fashion. Salvador is the smallest, but most densely populated, and, next to Costa Rica, most advanced of the Republics of Central America. San Salvador, the capital, has been repeatedly destroyed by earthquakes. In Costa Rica almost anything can be grown, but in 1889 the principal agricultural products were coffee and bananas. Balize is noted for its production of mahogany and logwood. The transit trade greatly increases the traffic of her ports. The principal exports from Central America are coffee and indigo; others are hides, skins, cocoanuts, bananas, pineapples, sugar, gums and drugs, “Peruvian balsam,” mahogany and other woods.

Copyright 1889 / Arbuckle Bros. / N. Y.

 

Collection

Ephemera Collection
 

Repository

Dumbarton Oaks Archives, 054.SUZ.02.PCbox.095
Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC
Accession number AR.EP.TC.0374
Creator
Date
1889
Measurements
3 x 5 inches
Materials/Techniques
text
Work types
trade card

Index Terms

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