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Reconsidering Chavín and Early Paracas: Interregional Interactions in the South-Central Andes

Yuichi Matsumoto, Yale University, Fellow 2011/12

Dumbarton Oaks provided a wonderful academic environment to explore the interregional interactions and diachronic socioeconomic transformations in the central Andes during the Initial Period and Early Horizon (1800–200 BC). While my project began as stylistic comparisons between the archaeological remains of two specific cultures, Chavín and Paracas, in relation to my excavation data from Campanayuq Rumi, my conversations with fellows and my attendance at two conferences at Dumbarton Oaks enabled me to consider much broader themes of ritual activities and the emergence of social complexity.

I spent the first two months exploring unpublished dissertations and manuscripts concerning the Initial Period and Early Horizon of the central Andes, which allowed me to reevaluate the changing patterns of interregional interactions and how they related to the “Chavín phenomenon.” Based on these data, I completed two chapter drafts of a monograph on Campanayuq Rumi. In parallel with this library research, I submitted an article on ritual activities carried out at ceremonial centers participating in the Chavín phenomenon. This article was accepted for publication in the journal Antiquity and examines how not only material styles but also ritual behaviors were shared between the site of Chavín de Huántar and Campanayuq Rumi. I finished two additional journal articles concerning metallurgy and residential occupations, both of which dealt with diachronic change in interregional interactions within the central Andes.

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