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Dumbarton Oaks Studies
The Idea of Apostolicity in Byzantium and the Legend of the Apostle Andrew
Francis Dvornik

“[Dvornik] shows that in the East the principle of apostolicity played no role in the organization of the church, that the power and prestige of a bishop depended upon the political importance of the city in which his see was located, and that it was only gradually and as a reaction to Rome's continuous use of the principle of apostolicity in its efforts to impose it supremacy that the East too came to use it. As for the legend of the Apostle Andrew—that he founded the church of Byzantium and consecrated its first bishop—it was known in both the East and the West as early as the fourth century, it was codified in Byzantium only in the ninth century, and it was not generally accepted there until the tenth century.” Peter Charanis, The Journal of Religion