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Performing the Past in the Ritual, Mythological, and Historical Landscapes of Huarochirí, Peru (ca. 1400–1700)

Zachary J. Chase, University of Chicago, Junior Fellow 2013–2014

During my time as a junior fellow, I completed three chapters for edited volumes and made enough concrete progress on my dissertation, “Performing the Past in the Historical, Ritual, and Mythological Landscapes of Huarochirí, Peru (ca. 1400–1700),” to send a completed draft to my dissertation committee. The library collections were invaluable in developing the conceptual framework and historical contexts for the following dissertation chapters: “The Myths of a Prehistory,” an analysis of the principal historical components of the currently prevalent model of Huarochirí’s prehistory; “Toward an Archaeology of Extirpation,” an exploration of the theoretical and material archaeological approaches to researching the destructive and productive religious interactions during the series of Spanish colonial campaigns to eradicate non- or quasi-Christian cults in the seventeenth-century central Andes; and “The Llacsatambo-San Damián Axis,” a presentation and analysis of the archaeological data from my dissertation fieldwork. Conversations with director of studies Colin McEwan and other fellows at Dumbarton Oaks were enlightening and beneficial to developing my thinking on these and many other topics. In addition to this progress in research and writing, and perhaps matching them in importance, were the lessons and training I received in professionalism. Through feedback from the community at Dumbarton Oaks, I learned a great deal about polishing presentations, concentrating and focusing their content, and making them accessible to audiences composed of smart and educated scholars from a variety of disciplines.