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Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss, July 15, 1917

Aix-Les-Bains

July 15th 1917Sunday.

Dearest Mildred,

I hear from Royall this morning that there might have been a chance of your coming to Aix,Elisina Tyler’s doctor had sent her to Aix-les-Bains for her health. See Alan Price, The End of the Age of Innocence: Edith Wharton and the First World War (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1996), 123. and I write at once to say that the news seems too good to be true, but that no greater joy could befall me than to have my dearest Mildred here with me.

When I mentioned my going away in July, you said you couldn’t possibly leave Paris before August, and that you thought of going to [word or words not transcribed from the original letter].Several of the autograph letters of Elisina Tyler were not included in William Royall Tyler’s gift of the Bliss-Tyler correspondence to Harvard University (see The Early Letters (1902–1908): An Introduction, note 1). At Harvard, these letters exist only in typed transcriptions where, often, foreign words and phrases from the original letters are not transcribed. I then asked Dr. Beauchamp if [word or words not transcribed from the original letter]Several of the autograph letters of Elisina Tyler were not included in William Royall Tyler’s gift of the Bliss-Tyler correspondence to Harvard University (see The Early Letters (1902–1908): An Introduction, note 1). At Harvard, these letters exist only in typed transcriptions where, often, foreign words and phrases from the original letters are not transcribed. would suit my good, and he said no, not at all. I didn’t insist further, out of discretion. O meanest of graces! How I regret it now!

Aix is quite delightful neither tawdry nor raffish in the least. There is some good music, lovely walks, a neat clean little town tucked in among woods, a grand view from my balcony, and the air so light and pure that it invites me to revel in the open sunshine.

I read two cantos of DanteDurante degli Alighieri, commonly known as Dante (1265–1321), an Italian poet of the medieval period. His Divine Comedy (Divina Commedia), an epic poem written between 1308 and 1321, is divided into three parts, the Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso, and describes Dante's travels through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven. over every morning,—a very good sign. I lead a lacy life, except on cure-days, when I have to follow a rigid rule, and enjoy the good food provided at the hotel. Dearest Mildred, do see if you couldn’t manage, after all, to come a few days at least before I go. I shall be here till the beginning of August.

I wanted to write to you before I left Paris to tell you how much I admired your splendid spirit in going through the fourth of July performances you did in spite of your grippe. But I had too many things on my hands to allow of such a luxury. I had to content myself with thinking all my devoted admiration.

Bless you. My love to Robert, and my fondest greetings to you.

Ever yours.

Elisina.

 
Associated Places: Paris (France)

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