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Elisina Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss, February 16, 1913

Paris.

February 16th 1913.Sunday.

Dear Mildred

Many many thanks for your dear kind note and for the miraculous drops. I will use them before I go and as soon as I arrive, and during the journey I will think over some of the things we have talked about together and so spend some of the time with you. Our dearest wish is to be often with you both, and we hope that the Vézelay Autun Beaune Dijon planA plan to visit the medieval villages and Romanesque churches of Burgundy in France, which the Blisses and the Tylers did in May 1913. will crystallize when I come back. I am so sorry you were “down” yesterday; but you are always valiant you know. Bless you.

I must finish my packing,Elisina Tyler was preparing for a trip to Italy. See letter of April 1, 1913. so good night, and my most loving thoughts. And if you ever feel “down” again may you remember the words I think so fine:

O insensate [sic] [the remaining words were not transcribed from the original letter]Several of the autograph letters of Elisina Tyler were not included in William Royall Tyler's gift of the Bliss–Tyler correspondence to Harvard University (see The Early Letters (1902–1908), note 1). At Harvard, these letters exist only in typed transcriptions where, often, foreign words and phrases from the original letters are not transcribed. The quote is possibly from Paradiso of Divina Commedia (canto 11, lines 1–3) by Dante Alighieri (ca. 1265–1321): O insensata cura dei mortali / quanto son difettivi silogismi / quei che ti fanno in basso batter l’ali! ("O insensate care of mortals! / How false the arguments / that make you beat your wings in downward flight!”).

And three more lines from the same book:

“Vien [the remaining words were not transcribed from the original letter].Several of the autograph letters of Elisina Tyler were not included in William Royall Tyler's gift of the Bliss–Tyler correspondence to Harvard University (see The Early Letters (1902–1908), note 1). At Harvard, these letters exist only in typed transcriptions where, often, foreign words and phrases from the original letters are not transcribed. The quote is possibly from Purgatorio of Divina Commedia (canto 5, line 13) by Dante Alighieri (ca. 1265–1321): Vien dietro a me, e lascia dir le genti (“Come, follow me, and leave the world to its babblings”).

All from the works of the diplomat who replied when ordered to go to Rome on a mission from the Republic: “[the remaining words were not transcribed from the original letter]?”Several of the autograph letters of Elisina Tyler were not included in William Royall Tyler's gift of the Bliss–Tyler correspondence to Harvard University (see The Early Letters (1902–1908), note 1). At Harvard, these letters exist only in typed transcriptions where, often, foreign words and phrases from the original letters are not transcribed. In 1301, the Republic of Florence sent a delegation, including Dante, to Rome to investigate terms for peace with Pope Boniface VIII. Oh the world was much the same six hundred years ago. Dear Mildred, again, bless you.

Yours ever,

Elisina

 
Associated Places: Paris (France)

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