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Elizabeth Chant

Elizabeth Chant

Plant Humanities Summer Program

Chant’s research examines how nature has been understood as an object for visual and physical consumption in the Americas since the early modern period. Her doctoral project, “Demystifying Desolation: Representing Patagonian Nature, 1745–1956,” analyzed conflicting representations of this South American region across literature, maps, painting, ephemera, and photography. This research elucidates how the trope of Patagonian desolation was both perpetuated and dismissed in order to facilitate acts of annexation, colonization, and extraction. She is currently developing a new research project that will explore domestic tourism to industrial sites in former frontier territories in Argentina, Chile, and the U.S. during the first half of the twentieth century.

Elizabeth Chant is currently concluding her PhD at University College London, UK, and holds a Royal Historical Society Centenary Doctoral Fellowship at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London. Her research has been funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, Society for Latin American Studies, and the ARTES Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group. Chant is a coconvenor of the Maius Workshop, which runs seminars and training programs for early career researchers in Hispanic studies and has previously been funded by the Spanish Government’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She has lived in Spain, Argentina, and the United States, and previously studied at the Universities of Durham and Cambridge.