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The Cathedral of St. Sophia, Kyiv

Where
Zoom
When
June 8, 2022
12:00 PM to 01:30 PM
Roundtable discussion with Thomas Dale, Ioli Kalavrezou, and Sofia Korol’

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The cathedral of St. Sophia in the historic center of Kyiv dates to ca. 1037 and is one of the most remarkable medieval monuments of Kyivan Rus. The building was designed, built, and decorated according to Byzantine traditions interpreted in a local context. This roundtable brings together three scholars who will address the distinctive architectural and decorative features of this impressive monument, as well as its visual and symbolic transformations from the Middle Ages into the present. 

Speakers:

Thomas Dale (University of Wisconsin-Madison), “‘In Heaven or on Earth:’ Saint Sophia in Kyiv and the Reinvention of Byzantine Sacred and Palatine Architecture in the Kyivan Rus”

Ioli Kalavrezou (Harvard University), “The Original Mosaic Program of St. Sophia in Kyiv”

Sofia Korol’ (National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), “To the History of the Interwar Church Decorations in Galicia: Kyivan Rus’ Images and Motifs”

This event is co-organized by Dumbarton Oaks in collaboration with North of Byzantium and Connected Central European Worlds, 1500-1700.

Sponsors and Endorsers: Dumbarton Oaks | Princeton University | Boise State University | Tufts University College Art Association (CAA) | Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA) | Society of Historians of Eastern European, Eurasian and Russian Art and Architecture (SHERA) | Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, University of Kent | Historians of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art (HGSCEA) | British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies (BASEES) | International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) | Renaissance Society of America (RSA)

Interior of the Cathedral of St. Sophia, Kyiv © Rasal Hague, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Common