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Western Basin Paleoethnobotany: Food Production and Landscape Construction at the Borderlands of Algonquin and Iroquoian Territory (1300 CE)

Lindi Masur, University of Toronto, Junior Fellow 2019–2020

During my junior fellowship at Dumbarton Oaks I completed the majority of data analysis and writing for my dissertation on Late Woodland–period subsistence practices in Algonquian (Anishinaabe) communities in the lower Great Lakes. Most importantly, I was able to dedicate myself to a valuable period of focused writing. Access to the Dumbarton Oaks library and the wider Harvard University collections allowed me to expand various lines of research into landscape archaeology, such as “placemaking” and “taskscapes” as theoretical approaches to food production. During my fellowship term I submitted a book chapter for an archaeological site monograph and presented my research at a regional archaeology conference at Brown University. I was also invited to speak to the local Washington, DC, Pre- Columbian archaeology community. I benefitted greatly from stimulating discussion and collaboration with the Pre-Columbian archaeologists at Dumbarton Oaks, as well as my colleagues in Garden and Landscape Studies. Mellon Midday Dialogues shed light on the diverse ways humanists approach contemporary landscapes, and the annual colloquium “Interpreting Landscapes of Enslavement” provided further opportunity to explore the legacies of racial inequality in colonial eastern North America as investigated through complementary disciplines like museum studies and history.