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The Archaeology of Taki Onqoy: Revitalization and Religious Entanglement in Highland Peru

Scotti Norman, Vanderbilt University, Junior Fellow 2018–2019

My research is based on the archaeological excavations I conducted at the site of Iglesiachayoq, an Inca to Early Colonial Period site in the Chicha-Soras Valley of Ayacucho, Peru. I research the 16th-century revitalization movement known as Taki Onqoy (Quechua for dancing sickness) in which Andean peoples rejected Spanish Catholicism and culture in favor of a return to pre-Hispanic deity worship. At Dumbarton Oaks, I completed my dissertation and prepared two conference presentations. I was also both an editor and a contributor to a special issue of the International Journal of Historical Archaeology entitled Status and Identity in the Impe­rial Andes. I received a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pitts­burgh’s Center for Com­parative Archaeology for next year.