You are here:Home/Research/ Support for Research/ Fellowships/ Fellowship Reports/ 2013–2014/ Professional Networking and Knowledge Transfer of Gardeners in Europe Using an Early Nineteenth-Century Example

Professional Networking and Knowledge Transfer of Gardeners in Europe Using an Early Nineteenth-Century Example

Kristof Fatsar, Corvinus University of Budapest, Fellow 2013–2014

My research aimed to demonstrate the operation of an extensive European-wide network of gardening professionals during the first half of the nineteenth century, as revealed by contemporary travel journals and other publications, as well as by the manuscript itineraries and reference letters of two traveling Hungarians. After the Napoleonic wars, “horticultural tours” were led throughout Europe, allowing gardeners to gather new plants and ideas by making professional connections with fellow landscape gardeners, botanists, and nurserymen. Gardening knowledge in this period meant everything from horticultural practices to botanical usage to landscape design. Horticulture was considered “practical botany” due to its abilities to produce new varieties and hybrids, and nurserymen were eager to put their hands on, to try to keep alive, and to propagate new species that botanists discovered in remote parts of the world, while garden architects, as landscape architects were often called at that time, used these discovered or created varieties in the design of pleasure grounds. My research succeeded in drawing up travel routes and personal connections among gardening professionals of the period across Europe.