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Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss, October 7, 1949

International Bank for

Reconstruction and DevelopmentThe International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), established in 1944, became operational in 1946 as the original institution of the World Bank Group. It was a cooperative organization of 188 member nations that originally promoted sustainable development and reconstruction to nations devastated by the Second World War. See letter of June 28, 1947.

Washington, D.C.This line is crossed out.

67 rue de Lille67 rue de Lille, the former Hôtel Duret, constructed in 1872–1874 by David de Pénanrun. Beginning in January 1949, the building served as the Parisian headquarters of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Paris VII

7 Oct. 49

Dearest Mildred.

Alas I shall not be here when you return. I am leaving today, by air, for the Near East, to take up a temporary assignment as chief financial consultant to the U. N. Economic Survey Mission,United Nations Economic Survey Mission for the Middle East. On August 23, 1949, the Palestine Conciliation Commission established the Economic Survey Mission on the subject of Palestinian refugees. Tyler had retired as senior representative of the World Bank’s Treasurer in Europe on September 28, 1949, at the mandatory retirement age of sixty-five. the Chairman of which is Gordon ClappGordon R. Clapp (1906–1963), an American authority on public administration and chairman of the Tennessee Valley Administration (1946–1954). (of T.V.A.The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), a federally owned U.S. corporation created in May 1933 to provide infrastructure and economic development in the Tennessee Valley, a region strongly affected by the Depression. fame).

This thing was fired at me only last week. BlackEugene Robert Black Sr. (1898–1992), president of the World Bank between 1949 and 1963. urging me to do it in terms which would have made refusal very difficult. It is not a Bank job, and indeed the Bank does not wish to appear to be associated in any way with the MissionUnited Nations Economic Survey Mission for the Middle East. On August 23, 1949, the Palestine Conciliation Commission established the Economic Survey Mission on the subject of Palestinian refugees. . . . but . . .

Well, my headquarters will be at Beyrouth, Hotel Normandy. Probable duration 2–3 months. What then, I know not.

I felt that if I turned this down, BlackEugene Robert Black Sr. (1898–1992), president of the World Bank between 1949 and 1963. would write me off, whereas I hope that if I don’t blot my copybook too badly this time, he may think of me for other jobs. This promises to be a dirty one, by the way, as Bill will tell you.

I’m very sad and low at the thought of missing you and Robert here.

Fond love to you both

R.T.

7.X.49

Just leaving, dearest Mildred. At the last moment, RattonCharles Ratton (1897–1986), a Parisian art and antiquities dealer and collector. Ratton studied at the École du Louvre before the First World War and was initially interested in medieval art. In the 1920s, he became interested in the “primitive” arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. He established shops in Paris at 76 rue de Rennes, 39 rue Laffitte, and 14 rue de Marignan. phoned, and I walked round. He has a very interesting Italo-Byz. head,Head, marble, 21 cm high. Byzantine Collection, Charles Ratton correspondence file, Dumbarton Oaks. which you must see. He thinks it is Vllth–Vlllth (why?). I think it’s about Xllth. But it’s good.

And he says he has, in Italy, a swordSword handle, bronze, 10.5 cm high (the iron blade, which was not photographed, is 26 cm long). Said to be from north Italy. Correspondence from Charles Ratton to John S. Thacher, March 5, 1951, Byzantine Collection, Charles Ratton file. like those the porphyry tetrarchsThe Four Tetrarchs, two porphyry sculpture groups of four Roman emperors dating ca. 300. Since the thirteenth century, they have been fixed to a corner of the facade of St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice. The sculptures probably originally formed part of the decorations of the Philadelphion in Constantinople. wear, on the outer wall of S. Marco treasure.

Fond love,

R. T.