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Royall Tyler to Mildred Barnes Bliss, December 12, 1944

From: Royall Tyler c/o American Consulate

Geneva.

12.XII.44

I have just heard it announced, dearest Mildred, that air-mail is accepted by the Swiss post for USA, without its going via Germany, and I celebrate the occasion by writing you the first letter I am sending thanks to these new facilities. If it reaches you by Xmas or New Year,The letter was annotated as received on January 30, 1945. it brings you and Bob my most loving greetings and wishes—and if it arrives later, it will convey them, with compound interest. Ouf! What a joy to be able to set pen to paper without wondering whether Fritz“The Germans.” is going to imagine there’s anything for him in what one may have to say . . .

I’m well, and enjoying work.During the Second World War, Royall Tyler took unpaid leave from the League of Nations to work for the U.S. intelligence network, run by Allen Dulles in Switzerland. Between 1943 and 1949, Tyler served as the Swiss representative of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) and, in 1944, as the special attaché to the U.S. Legation in Bern. I was able to get to Paris for two nights, a month ago, and see Bill, who I believe is now on his way home on leave.During the Second World War, William Royall Tyler served as a manager for a short-wave radio station (1940–1942), as an editor in the Office of War Information in Algeria (1942–1943), as the chief of press of the wireless bureau in the western Mediterranean (1943–1944), and as the deputy director and later the director of the Office of War Information in France (1944–1945). He’ll give you lots of news of me if he sees you, as will Leland Harrison.Leland B. Harrison (1883–1951), an American diplomat who was U.S. minister to Sweden between 1927 and 1929, and U.S. minister to Switzerland between 1937 and 1947. Allen Dulles brought me some of you, when he returned from his trip home.

He gave me a glowing account of the evening he spent with you in Washington, but couldn’t remember your address—which I interpret as a tribute to the cheer you offered him. So I send this to D.O.The whereabouts of Allen Dulles’s letter are unknown.

Elisina has been in Paris for the last two months working at her OeuvreSee letter of April 7, 1942. and cognate plans. I expect her back here any time now, but I understand she means to go to France again early in January.

This is not a proper letter. It’s just a little explosion of relief at the thought that one can write, now. I trust you will also be impelled to send me some news.

It has been the greatest comfort for me, throughout this long siege, to have LelandLeland B. Harrison (1883–1951), an American diplomat who was U.S. minister to Sweden between 1927 and 1929, and U.S. minister to Switzerland between 1937 and 1947. here, and these last two years, Allen’s presence has been a constant joy. I went through some bad times in the earlier stages of the war, as we all did, perhaps, but the old cork goes on bobbing up—though the liquid it floats in may not always change for the better. But when, oh when, shall we be able to sit down and start discussing it all?

Fondest love to you both

R.T.

 
Associated People: Allen Dulles; William Royall Tyler