Dumbarton Oaks Microsite

Fragment

 
Accession numberBZ.1933.23
Attribution and Date
Indian subcontinent, second half of the 10th–15th c.
Measurements

H. 16.5 cm × W. 15.6 cm (6 1/2 × 6 1/8 in.)

Technique and Material

Cotton; block-printed

Acquisition history

Tano Collection, Cairo; Robert Woods and Mildred Barnes Bliss, purchase (through Frances Morris), 1932; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC, 1940.

Materials

Warp: Cotton, single spun Z-direction, 15–17/cm. Selvage has 6 ends, 2 ends per dent.

Weft: Cotton, singlespun Z-direction, 17/cm

Colors: Undyed cotton (yellowed with age and mordants), pink-red, dark red, brown

 

Technique

Plain weave; block-printed with mordant and dyed brown, block-printed with resist and dyed pink-red. Perhaps repeated with resist and mordant-dyed dark red.

 

Condition

All four edges are well preserved. No wear can be seen on the fragment.

 

Conservation history

Stabilized and stitched to framed backing fabric (2003)

—Karthika Audinet, May 2019

 
Accession numberBZ.1933.23
Attribution and Date
Indian subcontinent, second half of the 10th–15th c.
Measurements

H. 16.5 cm × W. 15.6 cm (6 1/2 × 6 1/8 in.)

Technique and Material

Cotton; block-printed

Acquisition history

Tano Collection, Cairo; Robert Woods and Mildred Barnes Bliss, purchase (through Frances Morris), 1932; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC, 1940.

This fragment features twirling vines with trifoliate leaves and tendrils forming an allover background pattern. Eight-lobed circles and eight-petalled square motifs are arranged within the aforementioned background in a straight repeat, alternating with each other. The fabric seems to be coarser than the other samples of the Dumbarton Oaks collection as the thread count is lower. However, it is woven with equal density of warp and weft threads.

A fabric in the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford University has exactly the same pattern, and approximately the same number of ends and picks (16/16 per cm).Oxford, Ashmolean Museum, EA1990.802, http://jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/object/EA1990.802. This pattern was also produced in blue on white, as on another piece at the Ashmolean; in this case the fabric is finer (20/23 per cm).Oxford, Ashmolean Museum, EA1990.236, http://jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/object/EA1990.236. Another fragment belonging to Pfister is similar, though we are not sure if it was in shades of red or blue because it was published in black and white.Paris, Les Editions d’art et d’histoire, R.P.I. 67: R. Pfister, Les toiles imprimées de Fostat et l’Hindoustan (Paris, 1938), plate IXi. This fragment may be in the Vatican Library along with the rest of Pfister’s collection. It was published by Pfister with his own accession code. A piece with motifs that are comparable in scale, color, and pattern in the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford University was radiocarbon-dated to 1460 CE ± 70.Oxford, Ashmolean Museum, EA1990.804, http://jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/object/EA1990.804. This comparison, along with archeological data, help us to get a better frame of reference of the dates when these designs and motifs were produced and disseminated over spans of time as large as four to five centuries.

—Karthika Audinet, May 2019

 

Notes

Accession numberBZ.1933.23
Attribution and Date
Indian subcontinent, second half of the 10th–15th c.
Measurements

H. 16.5 cm × W. 15.6 cm (6 1/2 × 6 1/8 in.)

Technique and Material

Cotton; block-printed

Acquisition history

Tano Collection, Cairo; Robert Woods and Mildred Barnes Bliss, purchase (through Frances Morris), 1932; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC, 1940.

F. Morris, “Catalogue of Textile Fabrics, The Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection” (unpublished catalogue, Washington, DC, 1940), 429.

Accession numberBZ.1933.23
Attribution and Date
Indian subcontinent, second half of the 10th–15th c.
Measurements

H. 16.5 cm × W. 15.6 cm (6 1/2 × 6 1/8 in.)

Technique and Material

Cotton; block-printed

Acquisition history

Tano Collection, Cairo; Robert Woods and Mildred Barnes Bliss, purchase (through Frances Morris), 1932; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC, 1940.