Dumbarton Oaks Microsite

Fragment

 
Accession numberBZ.1933.33
Attribution and Date
Indian subcontinent, second half of the 10th–15th c.
Measurements

H. 52.1 cm × W. 41.9 cm (20 1/2 × 16 1/2 in.)

Technique and Material

Cotton; block-printed

Acquisition history

Tano Collection, Cairo; Robert Woods and Mildred Barnes Bliss, purchase (through Frances Morris), 1932; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC, 1940.

Materials

Warp: Cotton, single spun Z-direction, 15–16/cm. Selvage has 8 ends, 2 per dent.

Weft: Cotton, single spun Z-direction, 15–18/cm

Colors: Undyed cotton (yellowed with age and mordants), red, brown

 

Technique

Plain weave; block-printed with mordant and dyed brown, block-printed with resist and dyed red

 

Condition

One part has been carefully stitched onto the rest of the fragment. Some small areas are worn out. Slightly frayed edges may have been cut and neatened by the dealer.

 

Conservation history

Stabilized and stitched to framed backing fabric (2003)

—Karthika Audinet, May 2019

 
Accession numberBZ.1933.33
Attribution and Date
Indian subcontinent, second half of the 10th–15th c.
Measurements

H. 52.1 cm × W. 41.9 cm (20 1/2 × 16 1/2 in.)

Technique and Material

Cotton; block-printed

Acquisition history

Tano Collection, Cairo; Robert Woods and Mildred Barnes Bliss, purchase (through Frances Morris), 1932; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC, 1940.

This fragment displays a geometric pattern made of a grid of squares and rectangles decorated with delicate tendrils, quatrefoils within squares, squares within square frames with petals, and a symmetric motif of two leaves and a bud . The repeat of the blocks is visible. Some of the squares look rectangular or are distorted due to block misalignment. The fabric appearance is like BZ.1933.23; it is woven with equal density of warp and weft threads.

 A fragment at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford University has exactly the same pattern, colors, and thread count, and also has a seam.Oxford, Ashmolean Museum, EA1990.710, http://jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/object/EA1990.710. The similarity is so close that both fragments could have come from the same piece of cloth. Other pieces at the Ashmolean Museum have similar squares and tendrils interpreted with a surprising lack of geometric rigidity.Oxford, Ashmolean Museum, EA1990.721, http://jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/object/EA1990.721; EA1990.743, http://jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/object/EA1990.743. Pfister pointed out that the tendrils were derived from Chinese designs that reached India via Turkestan.R. Pfister, Les toiles imprimées de Fostat et l’Hindoustan (Paris, 1938), 84.

—Karthika Audinet, May 2019

 

Notes

Accession numberBZ.1933.33
Attribution and Date
Indian subcontinent, second half of the 10th–15th c.
Measurements

H. 52.1 cm × W. 41.9 cm (20 1/2 × 16 1/2 in.)

Technique and Material

Cotton; block-printed

Acquisition history

Tano Collection, Cairo; Robert Woods and Mildred Barnes Bliss, purchase (through Frances Morris), 1932; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC, 1940.

F. Morris, “Catalogue of Textile Fabrics, The Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection” (unpublished catalogue, Washington, DC, 1940), 433.

Accession numberBZ.1933.33
Attribution and Date
Indian subcontinent, second half of the 10th–15th c.
Measurements

H. 52.1 cm × W. 41.9 cm (20 1/2 × 16 1/2 in.)

Technique and Material

Cotton; block-printed

Acquisition history

Tano Collection, Cairo; Robert Woods and Mildred Barnes Bliss, purchase (through Frances Morris), 1932; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC, 1940.