Dumbarton Oaks Microsite

Fragments of a Tunic Sleeveband

 
Accession numberBZ.1953.2.70
Attribution and Date
Egypt, 7th–10th c.
Measurements

H. (warp) 15.2 cm × W. (weft) 26.0 cm (6 × 10 1/4 in.)
H. (warp) 14.2 cm × W. (weft) 21.7 cm (5 9/16 × 8 9/16 in.)

Technique and Material

Tapestry weave in polychrome wool and undyed linen on plain-weave ground in undyed linen

Acquisition history

Crocker Collection, San Francisco, Mrs. William Henry Crocker (Ethel Willard Sperry Crocker, 1861–1934); Loaned to the San Francisco Museum of Art until 1953; Gift of Mrs. Andre de Limur (Ethel Mary Crocker de Limur, 1891–1964), Washington, DC, in 1953; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC.

These fragments consist of pairs of bands in tapestry weave depicting beribboned birds set amidst flowering plants in beige, red, light green, dark green, blue, dark blue, purple, dark purple, and yellow-tan. The bands are placed in a beige plain-weave ground. The fragment on the right retains its bare warps on its right edge. The fragments, though related, are disconnected from each other, and show minute differences in coloration and decorative details.

These fragments likely come from the sleevebands of a tunic. The relatively simplicity of the design contrasts with the high quality of the weaving, which demonstrates above all a great sensitivity to color. The birds’ bodies, for example, are rendered in shades of green that offer weightiness and depth to the design. A similar color scheme and design for tunic decoration can be seen in fragments in ClevelandCleveland Museum of Art, 1982.94, http://www.clevelandart.org/art/1982.94. and Milan.Milan, Castello Sforzesco, inv. T 27. This fragment was formerly in Venice, in the collections of the designer Mariano Fortuny. P. Peri, Tessuti egiziani dall’età ellenistica al medioevo nelle Raccolte del Castello Sforzesco di Milano (Pistoia, 2013), 48, no. 25.

—Elizabeth Dospěl Williams, May 2019

 

Notes

Accession numberBZ.1953.2.70
Attribution and Date
Egypt, 7th–10th c.
Measurements

H. (warp) 15.2 cm × W. (weft) 26.0 cm (6 × 10 1/4 in.)
H. (warp) 14.2 cm × W. (weft) 21.7 cm (5 9/16 × 8 9/16 in.)

Technique and Material

Tapestry weave in polychrome wool and undyed linen on plain-weave ground in undyed linen

Acquisition history

Crocker Collection, San Francisco, Mrs. William Henry Crocker (Ethel Willard Sperry Crocker, 1861–1934); Loaned to the San Francisco Museum of Art until 1953; Gift of Mrs. Andre de Limur (Ethel Mary Crocker de Limur, 1891–1964), Washington, DC, in 1953; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC.

Washington, DC, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Ornament: Fragments of Byzantine Fashion, September 10, 2019—January 5, 2020.

Accession numberBZ.1953.2.70
Attribution and Date
Egypt, 7th–10th c.
Measurements

H. (warp) 15.2 cm × W. (weft) 26.0 cm (6 × 10 1/4 in.)
H. (warp) 14.2 cm × W. (weft) 21.7 cm (5 9/16 × 8 9/16 in.)

Technique and Material

Tapestry weave in polychrome wool and undyed linen on plain-weave ground in undyed linen

Acquisition history

Crocker Collection, San Francisco, Mrs. William Henry Crocker (Ethel Willard Sperry Crocker, 1861–1934); Loaned to the San Francisco Museum of Art until 1953; Gift of Mrs. Andre de Limur (Ethel Mary Crocker de Limur, 1891–1964), Washington, DC, in 1953; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC.

D. Thompson, “Catalogue of Textiles in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection” (unpublished catalogue, Washington, DC, 1976), no. 22.

Accession numberBZ.1953.2.70
Attribution and Date
Egypt, 7th–10th c.
Measurements

H. (warp) 15.2 cm × W. (weft) 26.0 cm (6 × 10 1/4 in.)
H. (warp) 14.2 cm × W. (weft) 21.7 cm (5 9/16 × 8 9/16 in.)

Technique and Material

Tapestry weave in polychrome wool and undyed linen on plain-weave ground in undyed linen

Acquisition history

Crocker Collection, San Francisco, Mrs. William Henry Crocker (Ethel Willard Sperry Crocker, 1861–1934); Loaned to the San Francisco Museum of Art until 1953; Gift of Mrs. Andre de Limur (Ethel Mary Crocker de Limur, 1891–1964), Washington, DC, in 1953; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC.