Dumbarton Oaks Microsite

Clavus Fragment

 
Accession numberBZ.1972.15
Attribution and Date
Egypt, 7th–10th c.
Measurements

H. (warp) 10.7 cm × W. (weft) 12.9 cm (4 3/16 × 5 1/16 in.)

Technique and Material

Tapestry weave in polychrome wool

Acquisition history

Collection of Royall Tyler (1884–1953), Paris; Gift of his son, William R. Tyler (1910–2003), Washington, DC, in 1972; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC.

This irregularly shaped fragment features the remains of a medallion and ground in tapestry weave in beige, red, peach, yellow, green, light blue, blue, light purple, yellow-tan, and brown. The surviving small medallion contains a colorful scene with vegetal, animal, and human motifs. A frame is formed around this scene by a series of dots, which have lost their wefts. Further remnants of the design are visible beneath the medallion.

The shape of this piece indicates that it preserves the end of a clavus from a garment. The schematized depiction of a riding figure set against deep green foliage appears at its center. The medallion likely featured a colorful gemstone design in its frame, now apparent only in the ghostly circles surrounding the central figure.

—Elizabeth Dospěl Williams, May 2019

 

Notes

Accession numberBZ.1972.15
Attribution and Date
Egypt, 7th–10th c.
Measurements

H. (warp) 10.7 cm × W. (weft) 12.9 cm (4 3/16 × 5 1/16 in.)

Technique and Material

Tapestry weave in polychrome wool

Acquisition history

Collection of Royall Tyler (1884–1953), Paris; Gift of his son, William R. Tyler (1910–2003), Washington, DC, in 1972; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC.

D. Thompson, “Catalogue of Textiles in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection” (unpublished catalogue, Washington, DC, 1976), no. 150.

Accession numberBZ.1972.15
Attribution and Date
Egypt, 7th–10th c.
Measurements

H. (warp) 10.7 cm × W. (weft) 12.9 cm (4 3/16 × 5 1/16 in.)

Technique and Material

Tapestry weave in polychrome wool

Acquisition history

Collection of Royall Tyler (1884–1953), Paris; Gift of his son, William R. Tyler (1910–2003), Washington, DC, in 1972; Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC.