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A description of a patent hot-house: which operates chiefly by the heat of the sun, without the aid of flues, or tan bark, or steam, for the purpose of heating it

A description of a patent hot-house: which operates chiefly by the heat of the sun, without the aid of flues, or tan bark, or steam, for the purpose of heating it

The end of the eighteenth century witnessed improvements to hothouses that eliminated the need for either flues or tanner’s bark, instead altering the glass hothouse design to be heated primarily by sunlight.  This predecessor of the modern greenhouse is pictured in James Anderson’s 1803 publication.

 
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